How to Eliminate Digital Distractions – Make the internet work for you, not against you.

From Jane Porter on Fast Company

Yes, it is possible to spend your whole day online and not get sucked into Buzzfeed’s “20 Cutest Dogs in Sweaters” or Chris Pratt’s Instagram feed. Here’s how.

SET EMAIL FILTERS TO REFLECT YOUR PRIORITIES

Important emails from clients, your boss and your family members should be at the top of your inbox when you check in. Set up filters that automatically file newsletters and receipts into their own folders, so they don’t clog up your inbox. You can read them after you’ve addressed the more important messages.

GET ALL YOUR NEWS IN ONE PLACE

Use an app like FeedlyFlipboard or Reeder, which create a feed of news articles from a variety of sites, and can be customized to your own preferences. When you read all your favorite blogs and news sources in an RSS app, you avoid the tempting banner ads and clickbait that usually comes with reading directly on a site.

STOP TRYING TO KEEP UP

If you try to respond to every email, tweet, Facebook post, Instagram comment, etc., immediately, you are letting other people drive your agenda. Instead of keeping up, make your goal staying focused. Choose intervals for checking your messages and social feeds (i.e. check email every half hour, check social media every three hours), and stick to them.

IGNORE THE REFLEX TO LOOK AT YOUR PHONE

We all know how it happens—you respond to a text and all of the sudden you find yourself on a friend of a friend’s Instagram feed, looking at pictures from 56 weeks ago. If you have less than five minutes of free time, consciously resist the urge to fill the gap by playing on your phone, and you will feel more present wherever you are.

 

 

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